Comprehensive Pain Management
(Formally known as Franklin Pain and Wellness and Warwick Pain)

Attleboro, MA(508) 236-8333
Franklin, MA(508) 507-8818
South Kingstown, RI (401) 234-9677
Warwick, RI(401) 352-0007

Franklin, MA • (508) 507-8818
Warwick, RI • (401) 352-0007
South Kingstown, RI • (401) 234-9677

Franklin Pain and Wellness Center

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Chronic Pain Sufferers Seek Other Options

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 14, 2017
Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA

Perhaps more than any other condition, pain reveals the complex and potent link between mind and body. The tension, fear, and frustration that pain incites can make it hurt all the more. Past trauma can set the stage for chronic suffering by sensitizing the nervous system. One pain condition often leads to another.

So chronic pain is rarely an isolated problem that will yield to a single remedy.

“We need to come together and see chronic pain in its entirety as something that affects the whole person,” said Dr. Sean Mackey, chief of the Division of Pain Medicine at Stanford University.

Mackey was cochairman of the committee that developed the National Pain Strategy , a federal plan for addressing chronic pain. The report calls for greater access to multiple treatment options so patients can learn to manage their pain.

In pain management programs, psychologists, physical therapists, and occupational therapists collaborate in coaching patients to manage their pain.

Each patient needs to tailor a combination of solutions for living with pain, said Michael Von Korff of the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle, a leading researcher in chronic pain management.

Psychologists, physical therapists, and occupational therapists can all help. We need to be smart about finding new ways of integrating them, making people with those kinds of skills more readily available where patients can get care. Where patients are getting care is at their primary care doctor’s office — a place already overburdened and ill-equipped to deal with the complexities of chronic pain.

“I see somebody with pain every day,” said Dr. Thad Schilling, chief of primary care at Reliant Medical Group, a Central Massachusetts practice. And yet, doctors get little training in how to understand and treat pain. Multidisciplinary programs are rare.

For information on pain treatment, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

Source: bostonglobe.com

What are the Basic Types of Pain?

Joseph Coupal - Monday, September 04, 2017
Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA

There are many sources of pain. One way of dividing these sources of pain is to divide them into two groups, nociceptive pain and neuropathic pain. How pain is treated depends in large part upon what type of pain it is.

Nociceptive pain

Examples of nociceptive pain are a cut or a broken bone. Tissue damage or injury initiates signals that are transferred through peripheral nerves to the brain via the spinal cord. Pain signals are modulated throughout the pathways. This is how we become aware that something is hurting.

Neuropathic pain

Neuropathic pain is pain caused by damage or disease that affects the nervous system. Sometimes there is no obvious source of pain, and this pain can occur spontaneously. Classic examples of this pain are shingles and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. It is pain that can occur after nerves are cut or after a stroke.

Nociceptive pain

Most back, leg, and arm pain is nociceptive pain. Nociceptive pain can be divided into two parts, radicular or somatic.

Radicular pain: Radicular pain is pain that stems from irritation of the nerve roots, for example, from a disc herniation. It goes down the leg or arm in the distribution of the nerve that exits from the nerve root at the spinal cord. Associated with radicular pain is radiculopathy, which is weakness, numbness, tingling or loss of reflexes in the distribution of the nerve.

Somatic pain: Somatic pain is pain limited to the back or thighs. The problem that doctors and patients face with back pain, is that after a patient goes to the doctor and has an appropriate history taken, a physical exam performed, and appropriate imaging studies (for example, X-rays, MRIs or CT scans), the doctor can only make an exact diagnosis a minority of the time. The cause of most back pain is not identified and is classifies as idiopathic. Three structures in the back which frequently cause back pain are the facet joints, the discs, and the sacroiliac joint. The facet joints are small joints in the back of the spine that provide stability and limit how far you can bend back or twist. The discs are the "shock absorbers" that are located between each of the bony building blocks (vertebrae) of the spine. The sacroiliac joint is a joint at the buttock area that serves in normal walking and helps to transfer weight from the upper body onto the legs.

Once the cause of the pain is diagnosed it can be optimally treated. For information on pain treatment, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

Source: medicinenet.com