Comprehensive Pain Management
(Formally known as Franklin Pain and Wellness and Warwick Pain)

Attleboro, MA(508) 236-8333
Franklin, MA(508) 507-8818
South Kingstown, RI (401) 234-9677
Warwick, RI(401) 352-0007

Franklin, MA • (508) 507-8818
Warwick, RI • (401) 352-0007
South Kingstown, RI • (401) 234-9677

Franklin Pain and Wellness Center

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Managing Pain in the Workplace

Joseph Coupal - Friday, May 18, 2018
Comprehensive Pain Management - Franklin, MA

Pain is the top cause of adult disability in the United States, costing the workforce as much as $334 billion each year in lost productivity costs, according to a 2012 study. While the musculoskeletal “pain points,” such as back pain and carpal tunnel, are well known and their direct costs well-documented, there has been less emphasis on—or awareness of—the secondary or mental health effects of pain: anxiety, depression, unclear thinking and memory loss.

Even what someone might consider mild discomfort or irritation can cause these secondary effects and can affect everything from sleep to diet to exercise. As a result, these conditions can—and often do—impinge on the workplace, with symptoms manifesting themselves in form of diminished employee morale, focus and performance.

There is also a “compounding effect”—the more pain persists, the more of an impact it can have. It may become a vicious cycle, as discomfort in one area causes problems in another. Employees who are suffering and unable to work miss out not only on the income, but also the sense of meaning, purposefulness and belonging that can be gained from a job. Initial distress may lead to chronic anxiety and even depression.

Those who are able to work may only be there in body, unable to focus and perform as expected. This is known as presenteeism and it can be an even greater drag on productivity than absenteeism. In fact, according to a recent report, the cost of presenteeism to businesses is 10 times higher than that of absenteeism and amounts to as much as 57.5 days lost per employee each year.

For more information on combatting the effects of chronic pain in the workplace, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

Source: Risk Managment Magazine

How Spinal Cord Stimulation Works to Treat Chronic Back Pain

Joseph Coupal - Friday, May 04, 2018
Spinal Cord Stimulation Works - Franklin, MA

Spinal Cord Stimulator (SCS) systems work by interrupting pain impulses before they reach the brain to help you manage your pain and lead a fuller life.

The Science of Pain

Your nerves and brain are constantly communicating with each other. And when you feel pain, it's because the nerves are sending a pain signal to your brain. The pain can be acute, which occurs immediately after an injury and goes away within two months when treated properly. Or the pain can be chronic, which includes any type of pain that lasts six months or longer.

How Do Spinal Cord Stimulator Systems Work?

SCS systems have a small implanted pulse generator (IPG) and thin wires called ‘leads” that are placed into your body. To manage your pain, the leads deliver tiny pulses to specific nerves on the spinal cord that mask pain signals traveling to the brain. Some people say SCS feels like a gentle tingling or fluttering sensation that replaces the pain. The medical term for this is "paresthesia." The feeling is different for everyone and the amount of pain relief you receive from SCS therapy will vary.

Spinal Cord Stimulation, or SCS, may offer hope for many of the estimated 100 million people who suffer from chronic pain. For more information on spinal cord stimulation for treating back pain, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Warwick, RI.


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