Comprehensive Pain Management
(Formally known as Franklin Pain and Wellness and Warwick Pain)

Attleboro, MA(508) 236-8333
Franklin, MA(508) 507-8818
South Kingstown, RI (401) 234-9677
Warwick, RI(401) 352-0007

Franklin, MA • (508) 507-8818
Warwick, RI • (401) 352-0007
South Kingstown, RI • (401) 234-9677

Franklin Pain and Wellness Center

RSSGrab Franklin Pain and Wellness Clinic's RSS Feed

Microdiscectomy, And Why Tiger Woods Once Missed the Masters For Back Surgery

Joseph Coupal - Friday, September 21, 2018
Spinal Cord Stimulation Works - Attleboro, MA

Tiger Woods underwent a microdiscectomy in 2014 to relieve the pain caused by a pinch nerve, which had caused problems for him for months.

According to Woods, he decided to get the procedure done “after attempting to get ready for the Masters, and failing to make the necessary progress.”

Woods missed the Masters Golf tournament due to the procedure.

When you hear the phrase "back surgery," you may immediately assume the worst: but microdiscectomies are actually safe, common, and relatively quick procedures that can help athletes with pinched nerves.

A microdiscectomy or microdecompression spine surgery involves removing a tiny piece of bone over the nerve root, or disc material, in order to relieve pain caused by neural impingement (or essentially a pinched nerve). The repetitive motions of golfers can cause back injuries; likewise, someone with a herniated lumbar disc will undergo a microdiscectomy.

During a microdiscectomy, surgeons create a small incision in the lower back, after which the back muscles are lifted off the arch of the spine. The surgeon then removes a membrane over the nerve roots, visible through special glasses. The nerve root is then moved over, giving the doctor the chance to remove the disc material. It’s a surgery that can be done in one day, with no requirement for the patient to stay in the hospital overnight. Pain is often relieved immediately after the surgery, and patients are able to go back to their normal lives shortly after.

Typically, patients undergo microdiscectomies after leg or back pain caused by a disc herniation doesn’t improve after 12 weeks. Often the pain can resolve itself without surgery, but a microdiscectomy is considered a viable option if the problem isn’t resolved.

The success rate of this type of procedure is usually 90 percent or higher. Most of the time,the operation is safe, effective, and rarely results in recurrent herniated discs. It appears Woods' operation was successful!

Other athletes treated for back problems are often quick to recover. One study looked at 80 professional athletes, across all sports including golfers – 90 percent [were] able to return to their prior level of sport.

For more information on microdiscectomy, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

Source: medicaldaily.com

What is Degenerative Disc Disease?

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 06, 2018
Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA

In a young and healthy back, discs between the vertebra provide height and allow bending, flexion, and twisting. The discs are like shock absorbers between the bones of the spine and are designed to help the back stay flexible while resisting forces. As a normal process of aging, the rubbery discs begin to shrink and lose integrity.

Nearly everyone shows some signs of wear and tear on the spinal discs as they age. Studies show that almost everyone older than age 60 has degeneration of the discs, but not all those people have back pain. In some cases, the discs may collapse completely and cause the facet joints in the vertebrae to rub against one another, causing the pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis.

For those people in whom the degenerated discs do cause pain that cannot be attributed to another problem, they are considered to have degenerative disc disease.

Degenerative Disc Disease Causes

  • Not actually a disease, degenerative disc disease refers to a condition in which pain is caused from a disc that loses integrity.
  • Several factors can cause discs to degenerate, including age. Specific factors include:
  • The drying out of the disc. As we age, the disc dries out and doesn't absorb shocks as well
  • Daily activities and sports can cause tears in the outer core of the disc
  • Injuries can cause swelling, soreness and instability

Unlike other tissues of the body, there is very little blood supply to the disc, so once a disc is injured, it cannot repair itself, and the discs can start to deteriorate.

Degenerative Disc Disease Symptoms

Symptoms are most commonly concentrated in the low back or neck, depending on where the degenerated disc(s) are. Common symptoms include:
  • Pain that ranges from nagging to severe and disabling
  • Pain that affects the low back, buttocks and thighs
  • Pain in the neck that may radiate to the arms and hands
  • Pain that is worse when sitting
  • Pain that gets worse when bending, lifting or twisting
  • Pain that lessens when walking and moving
  • Pain that lessens with changing positions often or lying down
  • Periods of severe pain that come and go, lasting from a few days to a few months
  • Numbness and tingling in the extremities
  • Weakness in the leg muscles or foot drop may be a sign that there is damage to the nerve root

Degenerative Disc Disease Diagnosis

A diagnosis is based on a physical examination and medical history, including a description of symptoms and the circumstances of when and where the pain started. An MRI can show damage to discs, but it alone cannot confirm degenerative disc disease.

Degenerative Disc Disease Treatment

Getting back pain under control – no matter the source – requires exercise to increase the strength and flexibility of muscles that surround and support the spine. Exercising increases blood flow to the back, which nourishes joints and muscles with oxygen and nutrients, while clearing away destructive inflammatory waste products.

Treatment options to go along with physical activity and exercises to increase back strength include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Medications: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, naproxen sodium), pain relievers (acetaminophen)
  • Surgery: artificial disc replacement, spinal fusion
  • Heat and cold therapy
  • Spinal mobilization
  • Degenerative Disc Disease Self Care

Along with following doctor’s instructions, getting the proper amount of physical activity, and strengthening the muscles that support the spine, you can manage your condition in additional ways. Make lifestyle choices, such as eating a nutritious diet, stopping smoking and address both the physical and emotional effects of having a musculoskeletal condition. Self-management encompasses the choices made each day to live well and stay healthy.

For more information on treating degenerative disc disease, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, MA.

Source: www.arthritis.org


Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Recent Posts


Archive