Comprehensive Pain Management
(Formally known as Franklin Pain and Wellness and Warwick Pain)

Attleboro, MA(508) 236-8333
Franklin, MA(508) 507-8818
South Kingstown, RI (401) 234-9677
Warwick, RI(401) 352-0007

Franklin, MA • (508) 507-8818
Warwick, RI • (401) 352-0007
South Kingstown, RI • (401) 234-9677

South Kingstown Pain Center RI Blog

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Pain Management Specialist: What To Look For and What to Expect

Darren Kincaid - Friday, October 27, 2017
Comprehensive Pain Management in South Kingstown, RI

The most important consideration in looking for a pain management specialist is to find someone who has the training and experience to help you with your particular pain problem. You also need to feel comfortable with them. Many types of chronic pain may require a complex treatment plan as well as specialized interventional techniques.

The widely accepted standard for pain management education today is a fellowship (training beyond residency) in pain management. Most fellowship programs are associated with anesthesiology residency training programs. There are also fellowship programs associated with neurology and physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs. The fellowship consists of at least one year of training in all aspects of pain management after completion residency training. When a physician has become board certified in their primary specialty and has completed an accredited fellowship, they become eligible for subspecialty board certification in pain management by the American Board of Anesthesiology, The American Board of Psychiatry and The American

Board of Neurology, or the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. These three are the only board certifications in pain management recognized by the American College of Graduate Medical Education.

In addition to learning about your pain physicians training and board certification, you also should ask whether they have experience with your specific pain condition and what types of treatments they offer. Do they only perform procedures or do they use a multidisciplinary approach to pain management?

Who do they refer to for other treatment options such as surgery, psychological support or alternative therapies? How can they be reached if questions or problems arise? What is their overall philosophy of pain management?

How can I be referred to a pain management specialist?

The best way to be referred to a pain management specialist is through your primary care physician. Most pain physicians work closely with their patients' primary care physicians to insure good communication, which in turn helps provide the optimum treatment for their patients. Patients are also often referred by specialists who deal with different types of pain problems. Back surgeons, neurologists, cancer doctors, as well as other specialists usually work regularly with a pain physician and can refer you to one.

What should I expect during my first visit to a pain management specialist?

On your first visit to a pain management specialist, they will get to know you and begin to evaluate your particular pain problem. This will usually involve a detailed history, a physical exam and review of tests that you have had performed. The questions you are asked and the physical examination will focus on your particular problem, but your pain physician will want to know about past and current medical history as well.

Often you will be given a questionnaire before your first visit that will ask detailed questions about your pain problem, and you will probably be asked to bring any imaging studies (such as X-rays, computed tomography [CAT] scans, or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] scans) or other tests that have already been done. You should know before your first visit whether or not a procedure is anticipated. If so, you may need a driver to take you home.

Most importantly, this visit is an opportunity for your pain physician to begin to analyze all of this new information and discuss with you an initial assessment of your pain problem. He or she may know exactly what is causing your pain, or perhaps further diagnostic procedures will be needed. But no matter what type of problem you have, you should leave this first visit with a clearer understanding of your pain and the course of further evaluation and treatment that is planned.

For more information, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in South Kingstown, RI.

Source: ASRA

Pain Management Clinics: What to Know

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, October 19, 2017
Comprehensive Pain Management - South Kingston, RI

At least 100 million Americans and more than 1.5 billion people worldwide live with chronic pain.

Most Americans with it say it's tough for them to sleep well at night and concentrate during the day. They also say it affects their energy levels and their enjoyment of life.

If pain is regular part of your life, a pain clinic may be able to help you.

What Is a Pain Clinic?

Pain management clinics are health care facilities that focus on the diagnosis and management of chronic pain. There are two kinds. One focuses on procedures to deal with specific types of pain, like neck and back pain.

The other, sometimes called an interdisciplinary clinic, takes an approach that looks at the whole person.

Often, the pain managment team may include:

  • Nurses and doctors
  • Psychologists
  • Physical therapists
  • Occupational and vocational therapists
  • Nutritionists and dietitians

In addition to medications, these clinics can help you manage pain with physical, behavioral, and psychological therapies.

They also may teach you about your pain, coach you on lifestyle changes, and offer complementary or alternative medicine. These can include:

  • Acupuncture
  • Biofeedback
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Water therapy
  • Massage
  • Meditation

What’s the Goal?

The goal is to decrease your pain and raise your quality of life. Treatment at a pain clinic can give you the skills to manage your chronic pain on your own and allow you to function better, possibly so that you may return to work.

Do They Work?

Multiple studies say folks who have comprehensive pain management have less pain and emotional distress. Research says people suffering from pain can do their daily tasks easier.

How Do I Find a Pain Clinic?

Ask your primary care doctor or specialist for a referral to Comprehensive Pain Management in Franklin, Warwick or South Kingston, RI. You can also:

  • Call your local hospital or medical center.
  • Get help from a local pain support group.
  • Search The Center to Advance Palliative Care for a list of providers in each state.

What Should I Look For?

Look for a clinic with a specialist who knows about your kind of pain. Ask if the doctor has had special training and is board certified in pain management.

As with other doctors, you should also try to find someone you feel comfortable with. Your pain management specialist will treat your pain and coordinate other care, including physical therapy, rehabilitation, and counseling.

A good pain program will work with you and your family to create a plan based on your goals. It will monitor your progress and tell you how you’re doing.

What Else Should You Ask?

Be sure to ask what kind of therapies and treatments a clinic offers. You can also see if they organize support groups.

A pain clinic should focus on the person, not the pain.

For more information on comprehensive pain management, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in South Kingstown, RI.

Source: Web MD

Back Pain Treatment: Non-Surgical Options

Joseph Coupal - Friday, October 06, 2017
Comprehensive Pain Management in South Kingston, RI

Prior to starting any type of treatment, it is always important to see an appropriately trained doctor or pain specialist to develop an appropriate treatment program for your specific condition and medical history.

The main goals for managing back pain in the lumbar spine (lower back) usually include:

  • Providing enough pain relief to be able to actively participate with physical therapy and rehabilitation
  • Preventing further injury or stress to the spine through improved ergonomics and posture
  • Maintaining an ability to function enough at home and at work

Non-Surgical Back Pain Treatments

There are a wide variety of non-surgical options for back pain treatment of the lumbar spine. The more common treatment approaches include:

Pain medication. Typical pain medications used to treat the lower back pain include acetaminophen, NSAIDs, oral steroids, narcotic drugs, muscle relaxants, and anti-depressants. Each type of medication has strengths, limitations, and risks, and the patient’s particular problem in the lower back and overall health will determine which pain reliever, if any, is indicated.

Heat or ice. Application of a cold pack or heating pad can help relieve low back pain. Some people find that alternating between the two works best.

Manual manipulation. This treatment may be applied by a chiropractor, osteopathic doctor, or other qualified health professional. It is thought to help relieve lower back pain by reducing pressure on sensitive structures, increasing flexibility, improving blood flow and reducing muscle tension.

Therapeutic massage. Massage therapy is thought to improve blood flow, reducing muscle stiffness, and decrease stiffness.

Exercise. A program of back exercises and physical therapy will usually include a combination of strengthening, stretching, and low-impact aerobic exercise.

Epidural injections. An epidural injection into the spine delivers steroids that can provide lower back pain relief by decreasing inflammation in the painful area.

TENS units. These electrical devices are used to interfere with the transmission of pain signals sent to the lower back.

Lifestyle factors. Many lifestyle changes are also important in reducing lower back pain, such as quitting smoking, weight loss, activity modification, and improved ergonomics and posture.

For more information on treating back pain, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in South Kingstown, RI.

Source: spine-health.com