Comprehensive Pain Management
(Formally known as Franklin Pain and Wellness and Warwick Pain)

Attleboro, MA(508) 236-8333
Franklin, MA(508) 507-8818
South Kingstown, RI (401) 234-9677
Warwick, RI(401) 352-0007

Franklin, MA • (508) 507-8818
Warwick, RI • (401) 352-0007
South Kingstown, RI • (401) 234-9677

Warwick Pain Center RI Blog

RSS Grab RSS Feed

Are Pain Clinics Right for You?

Joseph Coupal - Friday, October 20, 2017
Comprehensive Pain Management in Warwick, RI

People with arthritis and related diseases may benefit from the integrative care offered by pain management centers.

Medications have come a long way in treating arthritis and other related diseases. But when pain persists even with early and aggressive treatment, you may wonder if it is time to consider a pain clinic.

If inflammation is the main driver of your pain, a rheumatologist is the best person to manage that kind of pain because they are the ones who really have the expertise and know what medications need to be added to a regimen to get inflammation under control.

But if your inflammation is well managed (or your arthritis-related disease is not inflammatory) and you are still having pain, a pain clinic or pain management center may be your next step.

What Is a Pain Clinic?

Pain clinics focus on controlling chronic pain and there are two general types. One is for procedures, such as injections to deal with specific areas of pain, for example, neck and back pain. The other offers integrative services, which include medications as well as physical, behavioral, and psychological therapies.

This latter type, like Comprehensive Pain Management in Warwick, RI is often called an interdisciplinary clinic. It helps patients manage chronic pain with non-narcotic medications; nerve blocks; physical and behavioral therapy; patient and family education; lifestyle changes; and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM therapies may include biofeedback, cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, hypnosis, water therapy, massage and meditation. Services at multidisciplinary centers extend beyond doctors and may include physical and occupational therapists, social workers, psychologists and vocational rehabilitation experts.

A 2009 study of 108 people and found that after four weeks of this kind of comprehensive pain-management care, patients saw improvement in pain, emotional distress and function. Another study that same year found a multidisciplinary approach helped people with fibromyalgia symptoms, especially when treatment was tailored to a patient’s individual needs. People with disabling neuropathic pain from rheumatic diseases also often benefit from integrative pain management services.

More Than Medication: The Importance of Self-Management

Patients with arthritis and other related conditions should not seek out pain clinics that primarily offer narcotic medications. These drugs can be addictive. They don’t treat inflammation, can interact with other medications and don’t help the widespread pain of fibromyalgia. They can actually make fibromyalgia pain worse.

Most pain management doctors are aware of the downsides of narcotics. People can have increased pain when on narcotics because the medications change the way their endorphin system works. There are some people who benefit from narcotics, but it’s a mistaken impression if you think going to a pain center means automatically getting started on them.

Rheumatologists say chronic pain clinics are most helpful when they encourage people to become active partners in their pain relief. That means focusing on self-management techniques like adopting an anti-inflammatory diet, starting low-impact exercise, identifying a personal support system and making self-care a priority.

A study published in 2009 conducted 46 interviews of people with chronic pain and 46 interviews of people with RA-associated pain. The study found that for those living with pain, a sense of well-being is achieved not through pain control alone, but also through various mind/body techniques for managing pain, accepting new limits and adjusting the way people relate to themselves.

For more informaiton, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Warwick, RI.

Source: arthritis.org

The Benefits of Radiofrequency Ablation

Darren Kincaid - Thursday, October 12, 2017

During a Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) procedure, heat from an electrode is used to cauterize one or more nerves, disrupting pain signals to the brain.

To begin, after the patient has received medicine to help them relax and the area around the injection site has been numbed, the physician inserts a small tube called a cannula into the spinal area and guides it to the right nerve with the help of an X-ray device. An electrode is inserted through the cannula and its position is tested with a small jolt before the nerve is heated.

To heat the nerve, a high frequency electrical current is administered, which causes molecule movement and produces thermal energy. This, in turn, creases a small lesion within the nerve, disrupting its ability to transmit pain signals. The doctor may treat several nerves, if necessary.

Partial or total pain relief from radiofrequency can last for several months. Nerves do grow back, however, so the procedure may need to be repeated. But, unlike invasive surgeries or long-term medication usage, there are few serious side effects to the procedure, allowing you to get back to a better quality of life.

For information on Radiofrequency ablation and for a comprehensive treatment plan, contact Comprehensive Pain Management in Warwick, RI.

Source: apmhealth.com


Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts! Enter email address below.

Enter your email address:

Recent Posts


Archive